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BREAKING FOR KNOWLEDGE SESSION #11
BOOKSTORE SPACE
3 October 20:00
ESTHER POLAK AND IVAR VAN BEKKUM
ONCE WE GET THERE

The film introduces an alienating yet familiar landscape of satellite images, tracks and sound. We follow the minute by minute movements and sounds of animals, machines and people in Philadelphia. Although we constantly and intimately hear reality, we experience the movements within an abstract, two dimensional world of satellite photography.

Despite its meditative approach “Once We Get There” intensively questions our contemporary techno-society, where social connectivity and eavesdropping coexist and balances between empathic co-traveling and voyeurism.

The artists developed a unique recording method and visualisation: Traditional film arises from a sound recording synchronized with 24 photos per second. Within “Once We Get There” the synchronization happens between a sound recording and a GPS track. (one location per second) A wearable-technology bag “The Beagle” was developed to perform the recordings. A special software plugin was developed to realise the synchronisation and to decide on the camera movements and camera positioning in the 3D world of Google Earth. This way a poetic gap between image and sound emerges and continues to work throughout the film.

GRIGORIS RIZAKIS
MEMORY AND LEARNING IN UNDERSTANDING ART

Continental philosophy, within Europe at least, is so dominant which eventually shapes the way art historians/theorists/critics/artists approach contemporary art in a very specific way. The questions this way of approach prompts and finally the solutions to these questions/problems it offers, is something debatable, for most of the times it seems as if there no clear answers. However, analytical philosophy and science seem to be pointing to a completely different direction -- that of the logical and clear one.

Neuroscience, as part of the analytical sciences, has done great progress in the past 20 years as concerning its collaboration with the field of arts. Within this approach, there is one single hypothesis around which all questions are being generated -- that perceiving art/an artwork, is a biological phenomenon/has a biological basis and relates to neural functions and brain properties. One of these functions is memory and is tightly connected to memory which in advance plays a great role in the comprehension/understanding of an artwork.

During the thesis presentation, topics and questions around this connection will be developed, in an attempt to inform the audience about the developments in this field of studies with the hope that current misunderstandings/ misconceptions will be reconsidered.